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FUEL GAUGE SENDING UNIT TO FIT BEHIND THE SEAT TANK

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This is a 1968 FARGO Power Wagon with tank behind seat - so fuel exits out the top. I am in need of the sending unit and haven't found any listings yet. Rockauto may have listing - but under 1969 search - and, it is a back-order item. Does anyone have a reliable source - CDN or USA? Thanks.
 

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Thanks for link. I found this seller and he seems to have a variety of sending units - most are at $100. (U.S.) Considering the CDN $ exchange, plus taxes and shipping, the estimated cost to me (door to door) would be very close to $220. ! I will keep looking for more reasonable costs or perhaps a used item. My current sending unit has damage inside rheostat but otherwise no concern with fuel flow.

Now, without having to initiate new thread, does anyone know of a source (new or used) for the door lock mechanisms - as secured to each door with inside clip?
 

hansbuscher

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I was able to drill out the wiring rivets, clean and replace with 4/40" keplock hardware. The trickiest was lightly scraping the rheostat wire to get a good connection.
 

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i think i saw new door latches on moparts offered by tony's parts. the guy on gyc with that ronald guy mark

Sorry - - I didn't clarify well. I meant to say "the door-lock assemblies" - the part attached by inside clip - that you put the key into (from outside, of course). These (truck) items have larger metal trim part that surrounds the key slot. The car units of that era are smaller in overall diameter. Also, there is a difference, as told to me, between the way the actuating 'link' attaches - between some years in the mid-sixties. As of today, there are no 'internals/tumblers' in my passenger lock, so inserting a key does nothing. It is merely there, held by clip, to cover the hole in door. However, that door can still be locked, from inside, simply by pushing down on black knob, and unlocked same way - or by pulling on inside door handle/lever. So, all I need is new or used 'lock assemblies' with tumblers and actuating lever on back end. Hope this is explained. Thanks. :wacky:
 

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I was able to drill out the wiring rivets, clean and replace with 4/40" keplock hardware. The trickiest was lightly scraping the rheostat wire to get a good connection.

Hello. I don't fully understand reply. Yes, there is a problem with rheostat, but it is the moving copperish strip inside - that rubs up and down against (fragile) rheostat wiring. In the early 'cab tanks' this mechanism was attached very high so unless tank kept at least 3/4 full, the moving parts would operate dry - and therefore more prone to wear and earlier failure. I noticed the orientation of the newer sending unit parts (rheostat) is much lower in the tank, so would be 'wet' most of the time, even if fuel below half. It is possible this newer style mainly an upgrade and could well fit into the earlier tank, but I am skeptical. In the first place, the travel arc of the float is way different and also, the inlet and outlet pipes seem to point to the left side of tank - opposite to early style. Sending units cannot simply be installed 180 degrees from normal as there are slots on top and they determine one and only way to orient the unit.
I will attempt to transfer rheostat mechanism from A-body unit and custom attach the early truck style 'swing rod' and float part.
 

hansbuscher

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Yep. This part was meant to fail. Luckily, it's easy to get the sender out from the top of the tank. The brass wiper was gone on mine. Folded up a new one out of .010" brass sheet and soldered it back on with a 100W iron. If there's connection issues (the gauge reads empty) the little rivets that retain the rheostat coil and the + wire get oxidized and no longer squeeze their connections any more. Drilling those out and replacing with 4/40 screws and locking nuts solved all the problems. It's fiddly work and I had the Optivisor on for most of it. I also had to realign the gas gauge for Full & Empty. I also recommend replacing the gauge cluster 5V regulator with a silicon version. I DIY'd mine. Good Luck, Stay Safe
 

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All good advice. I could not use the A-body rheostat 'cause it has a much longer swing distance - seems like about 180 degrees to the truck's shorter 100 to 110. (guessing). The resistances also way different. No big deal, though. I got back inside the damaged part and strengthened where the thin brassy piece attaches to the steel rod. Very fragile and mine was cracked half-way across. The tip that wipes against thin wiring coil also worn so that there is a hole in that end but I just used it as is. The ohms seem to be in the range between 120 and 180. I figure a full tank would register almost 3/4 on gauge and go right down when near empty. At least it's working - for now. If I can find a spare part with similar rheostat then I may try again, or, find a new one for decent price. Mounting this part so high up means it operates 'dry' more often than not, so, doomed to fail.
Thanks again for input!
 

hansbuscher

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Hey. Great job. The hole in the end of the wiper is supposed to be there. It creates 2 mini wipers from one.
 
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